Tiny Houses company wins sustainability award for providing practical solution to environmental issues

Ever just want to move your house with you wherever you go and be off-the-grid and energy independent at the same time? Well, tiny houses are not just for the homeless, and one company that constructs them just won an award for environmental sustainability.

Tiny houses began as an idea to shelter the homeless but has since revolutionized the housing industry as more and more people reject materialism in favor of smaller spaces that fulfill our needs without leaving a big carbon footprint in our wake.

That’s especially true of these little homes today because they are specially made to work with the environment and be mobile, too.

Fred’s Tiny Houses in Australia, for instance, is dedicated to constructing these houses to rely on green energy and give people the ability to take their home with them anywhere they go.

“It’s really about living in a way that’s consistent with my values,” owner Fred Schultz said. “Peak oil, climate change, and just the unsustainability around the model that we have.”

Humans are desperately searching for ways to create a more sustainable world these days in order to preserve animal populations and save resources.

For example, many Australian chefs are only willing to serve sustainable seafood.

Schultz also believes that people are happier with less.

“It values a kind of simplicity in life that leads to greater happiness,” he said. “How many times do you hear the story where the person says, ‘You know the happiest we were was when we lived in that place that had nothing, it was small and it was tiny.’ Even just going camping and they’re reduced to just the essential stuff and they’re outside. People are like, ‘Hey, this is great, let’s do this again next year.’ Well, why not make that your life?”

Basically, tiny houses are like permanent campsites you can take with you. Just park your house in a forest or on the beach somewhere for a few days and then move on to the next adventure all while paying no electric bill or heating and cooling bills because the houses are equipped with an alcohol stove, solar panels, batteries and a radiant barrier on the roof that keeps the house cool in the hot sun, making you feel like you’re just sitting in the shade on a hot day. The house literally emits zero emissions.

“Everyone who builds a tiny house vehicle carries the responsibility of the tiny house movement on their shoulders,” Schultz continued. “When you build a strong, vibration resistant tiny house vehicle, you are acting responsibly on behalf of yourself, others around you and the whole tiny house community.”

And for his company’s environmentally friendly innovations and work trying to change laws, build communities and teach others, Fred’s Tiny Houses won the 2019 Flourish Prize “for business as an agent of world benefit for Sustainable Cities and Communities”.

According to the Flourish Prize announcement:

Obviously the tiny house movement is focused around reducing carbon emissions and the unsustainable consumerist lifestyle lived by so many. But there are many less obvious applications for tiny houses. For Australians in particular having a home on wheels could reduce the damage caused to communities during fire season or to adjust to rising sea levels. Off-grid tiny houses on wheels provide a practical solution to the changing environment due to climate change. They also have the potential to solve the large homelessness problem experienced around the world.

The units are also affordable, costing the same price as a brand new car at around $31,672, far cheaper than the average home here in the United States.

So, if you’re tired of paying ridiculous energy bills and are looking for a home of your own that can go wherever you go at an affordable price, a tiny house may be prefect for you. It’s certainly perfect for the environment.

Featured Image: © Studio Buell Photography & New Frontier Tiny Homes

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Stephen D. Foster Jr.
 

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